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Thread: The Three Amigos'

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Slick View Post
    It's my privilege to thank you for your service, 'curmedgeon.' May I impress upon you how your corpsmen are the most revered and dependable of sailors for us Marines. Some years ago I had the honor of a meet 'n greet with author, James Bradley, son of the Navy corpsman who helped raise Old Glory atop Mt.Suribachi on Iwo Jima. Like me, a proud and appreciative son of a WWII veteran, we swapped 'sea stories' about corpsmen in my experience and his limited knowledge of his fathers experiences. Any Marine who worked with the corpsmen like I did or benefited from their care will sing their praises.

    Not too long ago I came across a death notice in the Chicago Tribune of a fellow RVN vet. What caught my eye was his age, only 68 years young, my own age. It was sad for me at his passing and a slap in the kisser reminder that us of similar age are vulnerable now. Upon reading his loved ones' words for him included in the notice was the mention of his being a sailor and the standard American Flag depicting a veteran. And underneath the flag was the USMC Globe & Anchor, too. This tells of not only his proud service as a Navy corpsman, but that his family was well aware of his esprit.

    So, 'curmudgeon,' here's to you and to my Corps...Semper Fi.

    Love reading all your stories of true heroes. Thanks to the members on the board who served Tom Slick, Tomcat,
    Curmudgeon and Putmein < These are the ones I know about if you served just say hi and let me thank you too.

    I never served but my family has

    Dad was WWII army air corps shot down over Kunming China and was a POW who escaped after 4 months with
    one other guy

    Uncle Navy survived the sinking of the USS Hornet released from Bethesda Hospital. He was killed
    on his way back to barracks by a drunk driving officer.

    Oldest Brother served in Vietnam and was there less than 1 year and had a head injury
    He is doing pretty good.

    Next oldest brother served in the Navy over 30 years He was a "Mustang" and eventually became
    Commander of a Los Angeles Fast Attack Sub. He knows his SUBS Retired as a Captain several years ago

    Daughter is a Doctor who works at a Naval Base LOVES Veterans

  2. #12
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    Good read this thread once you get past the 3 amigo stuff.....

    I served from 1972-75 US Army Army Security Agency. Was going to be drafted, 'cause my Birthday was the 85th date picked out 95 dates for the last year of the Draft Lottery. I watched Secretary McNamara pull my name out of the barrel in January of 1972 on live TV. So instead of being just a grunt for 2 years I enlisted for 3. Met the wife at the Defense Language Institute at the Presidio at Monterrey Calif. An all branch base for the training of translators and voice intercept operators for Military Intelligence operations, recieved a security rating of TSC.

    That is where I met and married the Mrs. an army WAC studying Russian. I was studying Czechoslovakian. We ended up in Germany. Stationed at a listening site in W. Germany just across a "valley" from Czechoslovakia. The Russians had moved into Czech in the year of 1968 with force. Tensions were still rather high in the fall of 74 and all of 75. We wore out many tape recorders gathering intel in our tour at that listening post.

    My father who is now 90 served in Korea. He was part of the 5th Army, he drove a deuce an a half with a open roof .50cal ring mount. The day I was born he was delivery ammunition to the front lines at the Battle of Bloody Ridge. As he passed out ammo he also passed out cigars for his 1st born. His trailer that he was hauling with the duece had been blown off by a mortar round. But the rest of his delivery made it where it was needed. He carried a grease gun. Dad is all of 5' 3" and at that time weighed in at 160. While there was much action dad saw there was also fond memories camp activities like boxing. Dad was the Brigade NCO boxing champ. One day a Colonel from Battalion came to camp. He wanted to meet Cpl Joseph P. He had a proposal a boxing match against one of his Battalion champs a young Lt. Dad refused because he did not want a court martial for striking an officer. The Colonel assured dad it was sanctioned from above thru the Command chain. So match was set up.

    The Lt. was about 6'1" and 200lbs, dad was 5'3" and 160. Dad said for the 1st rd it was all he could do to keep his head down and his guard up as the Lt. was raining punches in from every direction. Rd 2 was much the same Dad still held his guard. But he noticed the Lt. was not throwing as many punches at the end of the round. 3rd and final Rd, the Lt started his same attack but by mid round his hands were starting to come down, the time between blows to dad's guarded head and body were slowing. The Lt. dropped his guard and let his hands come down and apart. It was the moment dad was waiting for. He gave a right upper cut to the chin of the Lt. Dad's only blow of the whole match. The Lt. went down for the count. They were using 16oz gloves. After the fight the Colonel let dad know his opponent was the Collegiate Golden Glove champion from the year before. No one had beaten him till Dad's 1 right upper cut put him down.

    My grandfather Joseph (Dad's dad) served in the U.S. Army, WWI in France in the trenches. We don't have much of Granfather's history as he died when Dad was only 4 years old. He was tormented, from what grandmother said, about the things he saw and had to do in the war. He died in a Mental Institution in Missouri in 1931. He was getting better and was supposed to come home. Then he was found dead. Grandmother said he used to get into fights with a particular orderly that was rather rough with the patients. His death and it's cause is still a mystery today.

    The wife's father also served as a 1st Lt. in Korea during the "Conflict" a year later than my dad.

    My Brother served during the 1st Iragi war.

    My son-in-law was Illinois National guard for 7 years.

    We are the last of our family to serve. I hope my grandson the last to bear the name Joseph E. P. (the IV) never has to.

    Back on Topic sort of: I've followed the Cardinals since the 1968 season when we lived 50 miles from St. Louis. That was my Junior year in HS. I'm Missouri born and raised. As stubborn as any Missouri Mule and ridge runner can be. But no matter how bad the team is I will not bash the players who give it their all. Not even back up QBs, much less HoF Wrs or RBs, or a rookie safety trying to make the team. I can not be disloyal to the team I call myself a Fan of.

    Specialist 4th Class USASA JosEPh


  3. #13
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    EDIT:
    Good read this thread once you get past the 3 amigo stuff.....
    I don't mean your 3 Amigos Tom. Sorry for the confusion, it's the "other 3" I'm referring to.

    JosEPh

  4. #14
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    Jan 2014
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    Default Firecrackers Are Dangerous

    Nice to have you back, 'JosEPh_II.' Figured your comment that way, especially for other readers. Good that you were in a talkative mood. It was a heartfelt read.

    My family, too, has many members who wore the uniform, both men and women, since the last centuries early years. Coming from two large families learning of these members contributions and patriotism made it easier to both figure my connection to them, help me in my history studies, and appreciate them. I suspect you followed a similar path and found your own way to make a difference. Your relating the story of service in Europe made me think of my wife's brother who enlisted in the Army because of a very low draft number. In 1971 having been trained as a mobile missile crewmember he joined a unit on the Czechoslovakian/Bavarian border. He always described it as being 'on the wire.' What he meant was his unit was a first-line of defense right on the quarter-mile wide anti-tank obstacle, barbed-wire, minefield separation with the Soviets. My own service and his may have been so different in fact and not in importance and fearfulness. Thank you for your manning that wall and contributing to peace thru vigilance.

    Tomorrow is the 242nd Marine Corps birthday with Saturday being our nation's solemn remembrance of those who gave the 'last full measure' of service. I expect tonight's game to have an extra-special program connected to those of the past and the present who 'manned the wall.' The Cardinal organization has always shown itself to go the extra-mile in this regard. Wm.Bidwill having served in the Navy could be the reason for this and impressed his family with respect and appreciation for those who wear the uniform. With the roof being open there might even be a flyover display! The nation could witness Valley fans singing 'loud and proud.'

  5. #15
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    I got myself sidetracked, 'JosEPh_II, and didn't mention why I headed my previous post as I did.

    The part of your read wear you describe your father's height challenge was enlightening. He came to an understanding in life like we Marines are taught. That is, 'Adapt-Adjust-Overcome.' He used what he had, courage, toughness, and to give his all, in facing up to a challenge. What a life lesson he lived. The story reminded me of this 6'3" boot being 'introduced' to his Drill Instructor for the first time, GySgt. Sharkey, at MCRD San Diego.

    In hia boondockers stood all of 5'4" probably weighed in at 140 lbs. and probably never lived a day of life without being hassled. Oh, he was an Iwo Jima veteran of seventeen and later in the Korean War and early in Vietnam. From him I learned what a Marine is supposed to be and right from the 'getgo' that one's height has nothing to do with their heart.

    By the way, my wife who's of French heritage, stands a tall 5'-1/2" and I am so thankful for my being schooled by the Gunny in preperation for 'adjustment' of forty-four years of marriage I have been allowed to enjoy. A life lesson anyone can embrace is, 'Beware of the firecracker or suffer the pain.'

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JosEPh_II View Post
    Good read this thread once you get past the 3 amigo stuff.....

    I served from 1972-75 US Army Army Security Agency. Was going to be drafted, 'cause my Birthday was the 85th date picked out 95 dates for the last year of the Draft Lottery. I watched Secretary McNamara pull my name out of the barrel in January of 1972 on live TV. So instead of being just a grunt for 2 years I enlisted for 3. Met the wife at the Defense Language Institute at the Presidio at Monterrey Calif. An all branch base for the training of translators and voice intercept operators for Military Intelligence operations, recieved a security rating of TSC.

    That is where I met and married the Mrs. an army WAC studying Russian. I was studying Czechoslovakian. We ended up in Germany. Stationed at a listening site in W. Germany just across a "valley" from Czechoslovakia. The Russians had moved into Czech in the year of 1968 with force. Tensions were still rather high in the fall of 74 and all of 75. We wore out many tape recorders gathering intel in our tour at that listening post.

    My father who is now 90 served in Korea. He was part of the 5th Army, he drove a deuce an a half with a open roof .50cal ring mount. The day I was born he was delivery ammunition to the front lines at the Battle of Bloody Ridge. As he passed out ammo he also passed out cigars for his 1st born. His trailer that he was hauling with the duece had been blown off by a mortar round. But the rest of his delivery made it where it was needed. He carried a grease gun. Dad is all of 5' 3" and at that time weighed in at 160. While there was much action dad saw there was also fond memories camp activities like boxing. Dad was the Brigade NCO boxing champ. One day a Colonel from Battalion came to camp. He wanted to meet Cpl Joseph P. He had a proposal a boxing match against one of his Battalion champs a young Lt. Dad refused because he did not want a court martial for striking an officer. The Colonel assured dad it was sanctioned from above thru the Command chain. So match was set up.

    The Lt. was about 6'1" and 200lbs, dad was 5'3" and 160. Dad said for the 1st rd it was all he could do to keep his head down and his guard up as the Lt. was raining punches in from every direction. Rd 2 was much the same Dad still held his guard. But he noticed the Lt. was not throwing as many punches at the end of the round. 3rd and final Rd, the Lt started his same attack but by mid round his hands were starting to come down, the time between blows to dad's guarded head and body were slowing. The Lt. dropped his guard and let his hands come down and apart. It was the moment dad was waiting for. He gave a right upper cut to the chin of the Lt. Dad's only blow of the whole match. The Lt. went down for the count. They were using 16oz gloves. After the fight the Colonel let dad know his opponent was the Collegiate Golden Glove champion from the year before. No one had beaten him till Dad's 1 right upper cut put him down.

    My grandfather Joseph (Dad's dad) served in the U.S. Army, WWI in France in the trenches. We don't have much of Granfather's history as he died when Dad was only 4 years old. He was tormented, from what grandmother said, about the things he saw and had to do in the war. He died in a Mental Institution in Missouri in 1931. He was getting better and was supposed to come home. Then he was found dead. Grandmother said he used to get into fights with a particular orderly that was rather rough with the patients. His death and it's cause is still a mystery today.

    The wife's father also served as a 1st Lt. in Korea during the "Conflict" a year later than my dad.

    My Brother served during the 1st Iragi war.

    My son-in-law was Illinois National guard for 7 years.

    We are the last of our family to serve. I hope my grandson the last to bear the name Joseph E. P. (the IV) never has to.

    Back on Topic sort of: I've followed the Cardinals since the 1968 season when we lived 50 miles from St. Louis. That was my Junior year in HS. I'm Missouri born and raised. As stubborn as any Missouri Mule and ridge runner can be. But no matter how bad the team is I will not bash the players who give it their all. Not even back up QBs, much less HoF Wrs or RBs, or a rookie safety trying to make the team. I can not be disloyal to the team I call myself a Fan of.

    Specialist 4th Class USASA JosEPh

    Nice Story til the End Jab stuff
    But not to worry i Will Bash the players in question for you........these are Paid Pro`s,not your HS team that you Rah Rah no matter what.........Paid very well i might add and could careless how much you Rah rah them or bash them as long as you send your Money...lotsa money........yeah I`ll Bash them til they do the job they are paid to do
    The Big A era begins.... Tick tock..7 games and counting

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RimrockCard View Post
    Nice Story til the End Jab stuff
    But not to worry i Will Bash the players in question for you........these are Paid Pro`s,not your HS team that you Rah Rah no matter what.........Paid very well i might add and could careless how much you Rah rah them or bash them as long as you send your Money...lotsa money........yeah I`ll Bash them til they do the job they are paid to do
    You glossed over the " But no matter how bad the team is I will not bash the players who give it their all. " statement. I've come to expect as much.

    As for the "not your HS team that you Rah Rah no matter what" statement, that's just denigration and extrapolation of how you "think" I am and not who I really am. Basically putting words in my mouth, which this MB loves to do.

    But hey it's your Right to Bash, after all it Is just a MB. Where unfounded opinions rule the day. It is what it is.

    JosEPh
    Last edited by JosEPh_II; 11-10-2017 at 09:15 AM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JosEPh_II View Post
    You glossed over the " But no matter how bad the team is I will not bash the players who give it their all. " statement. I've come to expect as much.

    As for the "not your HS team that you Rah Rah no matter what" statement, that's just denigration and extrapolation of how you "think" I am and not who I really am. Basically putting words in my mouth, which this MB loves to do.

    But hey it's your Right to Bash, after all it Is just a MB. Where unfounded opinions rule the day. It is what it is.

    JosEPh
    You are just no fun anymore JosEPH ..i fear you have taken the fall way to hard,,but i do know blaming us for the teams failures because we dare to have an opinion is a taddy bit silly don`t ya think?
    Just try this at home in a dark isolated room...say Stanton sucks! you will feel better,i know you will
    The Big A era begins.... Tick tock..7 games and counting

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